The Curse of Fibrin

clotting

If Fibrin didn’t exist, we would bleed to death, literally. But when Fibrin goes awry, it can lead to a host of diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cystic Fibrosis, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Fibrocystic Breasts, Endometriosis, Fibroids, Thrombosis, Cardiovascular Disease, Liver Cirrhosis, Heart Disease and a host of many other diseases involving inflammation.

When Fibrin works as it should:

“Fibrin (also called Factor Ia) is a fibrous protein involved in the clotting of blood, and is non globular. It is a fibrillar protein that is polymerised to form a “mesh” that forms a hemostatic plug or clot (in conjunction with platelets) over a wound site.”-Wikipedia

When Fibrin is the bad guy:

Rheumatoid Arthritis:

“Recent research has shown that fibrin plays a key role in the inflammatory response and development of rheumatoid arthritis.”-Wikipedia

Scar Tissue:

Not all scar tissue is considered bad necessarily, but when it’s in your organs, it can lead to terrible problems.  And when it’s in your brain, it can lead to Multiple Sclerosis.

The below paragraph says that there are “no direct treatments for elevated levels”, meaning fibrin levels, yet anyone taking serrapeptase or studying alternative medications and diseases and knows about enzymatic therapy knows that you can reduce fibrin levels with certain supplements and can effectively reduce your CRP.  So why are so many doctors in the dark about this?

“Sometimes fibrinogen (the test) is ordered, along with other cardiac risk markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), to help determine a patient’s overall risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This use of fibrinogen has not gained widespread acceptance though, because there are no direct treatments for elevated levels. However, many doctors feel that fibrinogen measurements give them additional information that may lead them to be more aggressive in treating those risk factors that they can influence (such as cholesterol and HDL).”-www.labtestsonline.org

“Fibrinogen is an acute phase reactant, meaning that fibrinogen concentrations may rise sharply in any condition that causes inflammation or tissue damage. Elevated concentrations of fibrinogen are not specific — they do not tell the doctor the cause or location of the disturbance. Usually these elevations in the fibrinogen blood level are temporary, returning to normal after the underlying condition has been resolved. Elevated levels may be seen with:

While fibrinogen levels are elevated, a person’s risk of developing a blood clot may be increased and, over time, they could contribute to an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.” –www.labtestsonline.org

If elevated fibrinogen levels are involved in inflammatory disorders, then here is a longer list of inflammatory disorders that would greatly improve with the direct decrease of fibrinogen:

“Abnormalities associated with inflammation comprise a large, officially unrelated group of disorders which underlie a vast variety of human diseases. The immune system is often involved with inflammatory disorders, demonstrated in both allergic reactions and some myopathies, with many immune system disorders resulting in abnormal inflammation. Non-immune diseases with etiological origins in inflammatory processes are thought to include cancer, atherosclerosis, and ischaemic heart disease.[4]

A large variety of proteins are involved in inflammation, and any one of them is open to a genetic mutation which impairs or otherwise dysregulates the normal function and expression of that protein.

Examples of disorders associated with inflammation include:

Allergies

An allergic reaction, formally known as type 1 hypersensitivity, is the result of an inappropriate immune response triggering inflammation. A common example is hay fever, which is caused by a hypersensitive response by skin mast cells to allergens. Pre-sensitised mast cells respond by degranulating, releasing vasoactive chemicals such as histamine. These chemicals propagate an excessive inflammatory response characterised by blood vessel dilation, production of pro-inflammatory molecules, cytokine release, and recruitment of leukocytes.[4] Severe inflammatory response may mature into a systemic response known as anaphylaxis.

Other hypersensitivity reactions (type 2 and type 3) are mediated by antibody reactions and induce inflammation by attracting leukocytes which damage surrounding tissue.[4]

Myopathies

Inflammatory myopathies are caused by the immune system inappropriately attacking components of muscle, leading to signs of muscle inflammation. They may occur in conjunction with other immune disorders, such as systemic sclerosis, and include dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and inclusion body myositis.[4]

Leukocyte defects

Due to the central role of leukocytes in the development and propagation of inflammation, defects in leukocyte function often result in a decreased capacity for inflammatory defense with subsequent vulnerability to infection.[4] Dysfunctional leukocytes may be unable to correctly bind to blood vessels due to surface receptor mutations, digest bacteria (Chediak-Higashi syndrome), or produce microbicides (chronic granulomatous disease). Additionally, diseases affecting the bone marrow may result in abnormal or few leukocytes.

Pharmacological

Certain drugs or exogenic chemical compounds are known to affect inflammation. Vitamin A deficiency causes an increase in inflammatory responses,[8] and anti-inflammatory drugs work specifically by inhibiting normal inflammatory components.

Cancer

Inflammation orchestrates the microenvironment around tumours, contributing to proliferation, survival and migration. Cancer cells use selectins, chemokines and their receptors for invasion, migration and metastasis.[9] On the other hand, many cells of the immune system contribute to cancer immunology, suppressing cancer.”-wikipedia

If you’re not convinced by wikipedia that too much fibrin is bad news, plenty of other good sources for information are out there, including pubmed.  Just do a quick google search on fibrin.

Hodgkin’s Disease: “Fibrin deposits were observed in the involved lymph nodes and/or spleens of 15 patients with Hodgkin’s disease by specific immunofluorescence and by electron microscopy. Two basic patterns of fibrin deposition were observed: 1) intercellular deposits, chiefly associated with nonneoplastic-appearing lymphoid cells and 2) deposits associated with the collagen fibers of young connective tissue. In addition, coarse fibrin deposits were observed in areas of necrosis, presumably a non-specific finding. Fibronectin was also observed in intercellular areas, but staining was less intense than for fibrin. Fibrin deposits were also observed in 3 of 6 cases of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, indicating that the finding is not an exclusive feature of Hodgkin’s disease. The pathogenesis and possible significance of fibrin deposition in Hodgkin’s disease are related to earlier observations of activation of the coagulation system on neoplasia and cell-mediated immunity and to the possible role of fibrin, fibronectin, and their breakdown products in angiogenesis and fibroplasia.”-pubmed

Multiple Sclerosis: “Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a neuronal as well as the key fibrinolytic enzyme, is found concentrated on demyelinated axons in multiple sclerosis lesions together with fibrin(ogen) deposits. The decreased tPA activity in normal-appearing white and grey matter and lesions of multiple sclerosis is reflected in diminished fibrinolysis as measured by a clot lysis assay. Nonetheless, peptide products of fibrin, including D-dimer, accumulate on demyelinated axons-the result of fibrinogen entry through a compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB). Analysis of tissue samples on reducing and non-reducing polyacrylamide gels demonstrates complexes of tPA with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) but not with neuroserpin, a tPA-specific inhibitor concentrated in grey matter. As total tPA protein remains unchanged in acute lesions and the concentration of PAI-1 rises several fold, complex formation is a probable cause of the impaired fibrinolysis. Although the tPA-plasmin cascade promotes neurodegeneration in excitotoxin-induced neuronal death, in inflammatory conditions with BBB disruption it has been demonstrated to have a protective role in removing fibrin, which exacerbates axonal injury. The impaired fibrinolytic capacity resulting from increased PAI-1 synthesis and complex formation with tPA, which is detectable prior to lesion formation, therefore has the potential to contribute to axonal damage in multiple sclerosis.”-pubmed

Since most of us are never ordered a fibrinogen test from the doctor, then my best assumption is that any tests that show an elevation of inflammation, would therefore mean that there is too much fibrin in the blood.  As you can see, too much fibrin results in inflammation and can lead to disease.  The only therapies that I know of that reduce fibrin are enzymatic therapies, which is why I take serrapeptase.   I prefer brands that are enterically coated.  Feel free to share your fibrin story.

Monolaurin: Quite the Superhero

Monolaurin: Fights H1N1, HIV, Yeast, HerpesIf you’re looking for a supplement with superhero capabilities, Monolaurin might just be it. Read on to discover it’s “powers”.

Monolaurin can be found in human breast milk and certain vegetable oils, including coconut oil. Coconut water is also another great way to get monolaurin and reap incredible superhero benefits. Monolaruin is like an antibiotic only without the side effects. “Antibiotics kill unwanted micro-organisms, but they also kill many friendly micro-organisms. Monolaurin, on the other hand, does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable digestive bacteria, but rather only on unwanted microorganisms.“-heranswer.com Beyond working like an antibiotic, Monolaurin can do so much more…..

Digestive Health: “Monolaurin promotes good digestive health. A good balance of foreign cells living in the digestive tract has a big effect on whether a person has good digestive health and also whether he has a properly functioning immune system. Monolaurin helps greatly to encourage good digestive health by making sure the contents of the digestive tract are in good balance at all times.”-www.ehow.com

Viruses, (Including Herpes and H1N1), Fungi (Including Yeast) and Bacteria ( Including E.coli): “There are many diverse benefits commonly associated with taking monolaurin, such as the fact that it is capable of balancing the body in a biochemical manner (encouraging self healing and prime health) and is capable of inactivating viruses, fungi and bacteria. It is non-toxic and does not create resistant organisms. It can be taken alongside the majority of medications.”-www.ehow.com

Monolaurin stops viruses, bacteria and fungi from replication: “This monoglyceride is remarkable in its ability to dissolve the outer envelope of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and certain protozoa. Monolaurin is made up of lipids (fats) and phospholipids. Most familiar is the triglyceride tested in cardiovascular risk assessments. …… the first obstacle in attacking pathogenic bacteria and viruses is getting through their outer protective membrane. Monolaurin does this. By destroying the outer membrane, the bacteria and virus is now rendered vulnerable to further destruction. Antibiotics do not dissolve the outer membrane. Their goal is to get through pores (porins), which can shift position. Monolaurin has also been reported to interfere with bacteria and viral ability to reproduce. This is accomplished by interfering with signal transduction, causing failure for the bacteria or virus cell to replicate (reproduce).”-healthkingenterprise.com

Immune System: “Monolaurin is a type of anti-microbial agent that helps the immune system. It is extracted from lauric acid, a fatty acid that also functions as a germicide. Lauric acid is a component of human breast milk, and microbiologists have found that it functions to strengthen the immune systems of babies (whose systems have not fully developed yet).”-www.ehow.com

AIDS: “Monolaurin is known to be effective against several lipid-coated viruses (a class which includes the AIDS virus), and against certain bacteria as well.”-www.aids.org

Safety of use: “One advantage to taking monolaurin is that it is known for being safe. It contains a major ingredient of breast milk, which is lauric acid. Newborn babies rely on their mothers’ breast milk to build up their immune systems. Breast milk contains an abundance of lauric acid monoglycerides.”-www.ehow.com

FDA Approved when buying Lauricidin: “Approved by the FDA, Lauricidin® is the only monolaurin supplement that has undergone clinical trials and laboratory testing. Its antiviral effect is due to monolaurin’s ability to disintegrate the lipid membrane of the virus and interfere with viral maturation. Some of the viruses inactivated by Lauricidin® are oral and genital herpes, Epstein Barr (chronic fatigue and mononucleosis), shingles, HIV, hepatitis C, cytomegalovirus, visna virus, measles, influenza, leukemia, viral pneumonia, vesicular-stomatitis, rubella, respiratory synctial virus, dengue virus, and lymphocytic choriomeningitis. Current research in Kenya with villagers suffering from HIV and other severe illnesses has shown dramatic improvements in the health of those given Lauricidin®.”-lauricidin.com

Inflammation:“In the viral study researchers were doing research in an animal model that parallels early HIV infection and transmission. They found that monolaurin had a powerful influence on signaling dendritic cells, reducing excessive inflammation, and thereby blunting the process that leads to viral infection. The researchers concluded that their study ‘opens a promising new avenue for the development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission.’ While the flu was not part of this study, the mechanism involved suggests that monolaurin could be useful in helping to prevent excessive inflammation during flu infection by supporting the vital needs of dendritic cells.”-wellnessresources.com

I originally came across the topic of Monolaurin in Daily Strength, a website I frequent for support and as well as giving support. Someone suggested that Monolaurin, when taken on a regular basis, gave her more energy and kept her from getting sick. As I read further, I found more and more people who took monolaurin and found it to be a very powerful supplement. I did decide to take it for around two months. I believe I chose to take five a day, which is less than the therapeutic dose. Although Monolaurin isn’t a cheap supplement, I have discovered just now that lauricidin is pretty affordable. It’s also suppose to be more potent than taking a monolaurin supplement on its own. It comes in scoops of powder vs pills, which is a relief for me because sometimes I’m a little overwhelmed with pills. For a 4-6 week supply, the cost is $30. From everything I have read, it seems like monolaurin or lauricidin could be an essential supplement for people who have troubled immune systems and are on the alternative path. Many of us who suffer from autoimmune diseases also suffer from Epstein Bar Virus, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Candida, among many other things that may benefit by taking Monolaurin or Laurididin. Perhaps if those other issues were taken care of, our autoimmune diseases could have a chance at true healing over time.

Mercury at the dentist’s office

With little fanfare, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration earlier this week acknowledged on its Web site that mercury amalgam fillings -- the silvery material used for decades to plug cavities -- could be harmful.

With little fanfare, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration earlier this week acknowledged on its Web site that mercury amalgam fillings -- the silvery material used for decades to plug cavities -- could be harmful.

“Mercury is highly toxic to human beings.  In addition, having toxic metals in your body increases the activity and the damage done by free radicals…”

I missed part of the conversation on the radio the other day. A man who is part of the American Dental Association said that dentists are STILL using mercury for fillings, but that they don’t tell you it’s mercury, they tell you it’s silver. He even said that that phrase “silver” is encouraged and that dentists are discouraged to ever use the term mercury. He also said that mercury causes Alzheimer’s, and a host of other diseases, as well as can cause infertility. The dentist office itself, because it has mercury in the air is a toxic place, especially to pregnant women.

The radio host was shocked and kept asking why in the world were dentists still using mercury?  Apparently, the FDA thinks it’s safe.  “The FDA has, for decades, ridiculously insisted that mercury fillings pose no health threat whatsoever to children.” The guest explained that mercury fillings are faster because there’s less craftsmanship involved and it can mold much more quickly, etc.  Basically, a dentist can get far more patients in and out.  When asked if he thought Mercury could cause autism, his answer was yes.

“For years there has been debate in the dental profession regarding the pros and cons of using silver amalgam fillings, which contain about 50% mercury, to restore cavities.”

“A single dental amalgam filling with a surface area of only 1/2 square cm is estimated to release as much as 15 micrograms of mercury per day primarily through evaporation and mechanical wear.”

I explained my concern and what I had heard on the radio to a friend the other day.   She told me that her acupuncturist knew many Lupus patients who had their silver fillings taken out– only to show no improvement.

As I thought about it what my friend told me, I realized that if you don’t understand how drugs work with autoimmune diseases, then this acupuncturist simply isn’t putting two and two together.

Lupus, just like Rheumatoid Arthritis is medicated with corticosteroids and chemotherapy drugs, generally speaking.  This means that the body is being told not to react.  Both corticosteroids and chemotherapy drugs are immune suppressant drugs.  Even if an infection were to enter the body, a person who is on these drugs can and most likely will have trouble fighting off the infection because their body isn’t reacting to the infection in a normal, healthy way.  Instead, the drugs tell the body to basically shut off all reactions.  Even cuts are suppose to be reported to your doctor if you are on these drugs.  Cuts can turn into infections and infections can turn into serious complications which have in some cases, lead to death.   My suggestion to her was that, a Lupus patient wasn’t a good example of whether or not removing the fillings were helpful because of the drugs keep you from knowing what’s really going on.  If however, you took an autistic child that is being treated with diet only and not drugs, and changed out their fillings, then that might be a better example of how mercury fillings affect the body because they are so sensitive.

If you have a choice between a silver filling or a ceramic one, I think the choice is obvious regardless of the price.  “Amalgam is a blend of mercury, silver and other metals; when they bond together, the mercury is said to be rendered stable and unlikely to leach into your system. But lots of people beg to differ, saying the mercury not only is absorbed by the body but may cause neurological problems. Some believe mercury fillings trigger such disorders as multiple sclerosis, though research hasn’t borne that out.“”

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